The Cotehele Garland

The Cotehele Garland

 

The tradition of making a garland for the Tudor Hall at Cotehele House only started in the 1950s, but has since become a firm annual favourite at Christmastime.

People come from miles around to see this 18 metre (60 foot) long decoration that starts its life in the Cut Flower Garden at Cotehele. The seeds are sown in February, the flowers cut in the summer, and then hung in the potting shed to dry until the Autumn.

The aim is to get around 30,000 stems, but it will depend on the conditions which can vary from year to year.

In early November a 12mm diameter rope is laid out on the floor where bunches of evergreen pittosporum are attached and then hoisted up to the ceiling where it is hung in swags.
The flowers are then cut, sorted, and placed individually amongst the evergreen.

Apparently, the process from planting the seeds to the last flower being attached involves staff and volunteers working an equivalent number of hours to one full time employee a year.

The garland is usually on display from around the middle of November until the 12th night (Jan 6th), except Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

The garland is usually on display from around the middle of November until the 12th night (Jan 6th), except Christmas Day and Boxing Day.

The Hall where the garland is hung is the only room open in the house at this time of year, and although the NT say that there’s no charge to see the display, you will still need to pay to visit the property, unless you’re a member of the National Trust of course.

Most of the estate is open including the Barn Restaurant where a heart-warming bowl of soup might just hit the spot afterwards.

For more information about Cotehele at Christmas don’t forget to visit their website.

https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cotehele/features/christmas-at-cotehele

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